Recently most of my attention has been on Javascript, most specifically Vue.js. For the last couple months I built out a game in vanilla JS and then rebuilt it (while adding new features) in Vue. The experience has been great and I’ve learned a ton about Vue and JS in general. I’m a bit burned our writing about my experience during this time so I wanted to write about something a bit different. I decided that it would be fun to write a mini series about recreating small portions of user interfaces that I’ve come across that I liked. …


A project I’m working on, a silly accumulator game, calls for a way for some information to be saved. Right now any progress that a user has made is erased when they close the tab. browser, or turn off their computer. I would like to allow users to have the ability to pick up where they left off if they do close the tab though. I though about creating a full backend to store user information but ultimately decided that was overkill. So I turned my attention to localstorage, which will allow me to save user’s data from session to…


I just completed my first project with Vue.js, well at least version 1 of the project. I plan to continue to add new features and content to my silly game in the future. Now I just wanted to share my thoughts about Vue. I wrote up an initial impressions post when I started on my project and felt it may be beneficial to re-evaluate those thoughts now that I have more experience with Vue.js.

My Impression of Vue.js Now

Well, simply, nothing has really changed. I really enjoyed my entire experience with Vue.js while working on this project. Most of the time things were really…


As I continue to work with Vue.js I run into more roadblocks, allowing me to dig deeper and deeper into the inner workings of it. One of those roadblocks has been how reactivity in Vue works. After reading some articles and watching a course on Vue by Sarah Drasner, I felt I had a pretty good understanding of reactivity. And, big picture wise as a concept, I did. However as I worked on a project I found that this was not the case. Specificallu there are some caveats of change detection in Vue that I just didn’t understand. …


As I continue into working with Vue.js I have come to enjoy working with it more and more. With my previous experience with vanilla JS and React, many things in Vue have seemed easier to pick up than I was expecting. However, like anything to do with software development, there are always sticking points and places where I feel I don’t have a great grasp on. One of these things is computed properties and methods. What exactly are they and how do they differ from each other? So let’s take a more in depth look at each.

What Is A Computed Property?

According to the…


I have recently been working on a project in Vue.js and, overall, have had a very positive experience. Because of the requirements for this particular project, I felt I needed a state management solution. This resulted in me diving into learning about and implementing Vuex in my project and I just wanted to share what I found to hopefully help others in the future. To start what exactly is Vuex?

What is Vuex?

According to its documentation, “Vuex is a state management pattern + library for Vue.js applications. It serves as a centralized store for all the components in an application, with rules…


To this point, when making HTTP requests, I’ve only used the fetch API. It has been sufficient for my needs but I wanted to explore some alternatives that may have additional benefits. I came across a few options including the XMLHttpRequest interface, libraries such as jQuery, and Axios. I decided to look into Axios further and see what benefits it may provide over the Fetch API.

So what exactly is Axios? Simply put, Axios is a promise based HTTP client for the browser and node.js. It does much of the same as the fetch API with some added benefits. …


Vue.js has been on my list of things to explore in the world of web development. People I like to follow in the web dev industry have spoken about it very positively so I decided I’d give it a try. As a result I just started working on a project using Vue.js and just wanted to share my initial impressions and some of the things I’ve learned so far.

My first introduction to Vue was by taking an introductory course about it from FrontEnd Masters by Sarah Drasner. I just wanted to get a taste of what working with Vue…


Recently my posts have been exploring some of the technical concepts of Javascript including async/await, closures, and callbacks, among others. This time I wanted to change it up a bit so I decided to learn how to animate elements when they appear in your browser when their location is reached on scroll. You’ve probably seen this effect often while browsing the web. One of the most notable examples that I’ve come across is Apple.

On nearly any product page of Apple’s they always have really cool animations that are triggered on scroll. Just check out the iPhone 12 Pro product…


Async functions and the await keyword were added to Javascript as part of ECMAScript 2017. They act as a syntactical sugar on top of promises with the goal of making asynchronous code easier to read and write. It would be helpful to have an understanding of asynchronous programming, how it functions in Javascript, and how it differs from synchronous Javascript. I’ll link a couple good resources below so you can learn about it (or to brush up) before diving deeper into async/await.

Now lets dive into the topic at hand…

Daniel Kersten

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store